Keeping Up With The Jones Act
Keeping Up With The Jones Act [infographic]

Maritime Law can be confusing and complicated. The Jones Act and The Longshore & Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act are the two main laws covering injuries at sea. This infographic has facts and statistics about the Jones Act and explains what and who is covered in the event of a maritime accident.

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Presented by Gauthier Amedee

Keeping Up With The Jones Act

ABOUT THE JONES ACT

The Jones Act is a law that applies to certain maritime workers when injured. Suits can be filed directly against employers, and monetary damages can be awarded in cases of negligence or if a vessel’s unseaworthiness contributed to an injury. Recoverable damages include loss of wage earning capacity, diminished quality of life, medical expenses, pain and suffering, and mental anguish.

 

ARE YOU COVERED UNDER THE JONES ACT?

Workers must spend at least 30% of their time on vessel to be considered a seaman, and therefore covered under the Jones Act. If it is determined that an injured worker does not fall under the category of seaman, they may still be able to recover damages under the Longshore & Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act.

 

HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOU HAVE A JONES ACT CLAIM?

Claims need to determine that an employer’s negligence or an unseaworthy/unsafe condition contributed to an injury. Failure to provide a safe workplace is considered negligence.

 

EXAMPLES OF NEGLIGENCE

Faulty equipment

Dangerous conditions

Inadequate training

Improper medical/first aid staff

 

UNSEAWORTHY CONDITION EXAMPLES

Weak/unstable structures

Lack of safety equipment

Improper maintenance

Insufficient staffing

Slippery surfaces

Poorly trained crew

 

INJURIES COVERED UNDER THE JONES ACT

Injuries sustained on or off the vessel are covered, as long as the seaman was working in the service of an offshore vessel in navigable waters.

 

COMMON INJURIES COVERED

Falling overboard

Chemical burns

Toxic fumes exposure

Broken bones

Spinal cord & head injuries

Burns

 

WHAT IS CONSIDERED A VESSEL?

Vessels are covered as long as they have not been removed from navigation. These include, but not limited to:

Tug boats

Cargo ships

Cruise ships

Semi-submersible rigs

Mobile offshore drilling units

Barges

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’VE BEEN INJURED

If you?ve been injured in a maritime accident, time is of the essence.

Contact an experienced attorney right away.

 

Federal law states that an injury must be reported within 7 days.

A JONES ACT lawsuit must be filed within 3 years from the date of the injury

 

A lawyer specializing in maritime law can help you determine whether your injury falls under the Jones Act or the Longshore & Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act.

 

Gauthier Amedee APLC, Personal Injury Law

 

Maritime Accidents

Car Wrecks

Serious Injury

Fires/Explosions

Wrongful Death

 

225-647-1700

Gauthier Amedee

2111 S. Burnside Ave.

Gonzales, LA 70737

DONTDELAY.COM

July 3rd, 2019